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k9diabetes
08-20-2008, 06:57 PM
From:
The latest management recommendations for cats and dogs with nonketotic diabetes mellitus
Audrey Cook, DACVIM
IN: Veterinary Medicine
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/advanstar/vm0907/index.php?startid=600


Regular Insulin. Regular insulin is a human recombinant type available in a U-100 concentration (e.g. Humulin R - Eli Lilly, Novolin R - Novo Nordisk,). Regular insulin is highly potent and is generally reserved for in-hospital use in ketoacidotic animals. It is the only insulin that can be administered intravenously. Careful monitoring is necessary to prevent a precipitous drop in serum glucose concentrations, and it is not an appropriate choice for in-home therapy. [Unless you're Chris.]

Vetsulin. This lente insulin from Intervet, known as Caninsulin outside the U.S. is of porcine origin and comes in a U-40 concentration. It is an aqueous zinc suspension of amorphous and crystalline insulin, which produces two peaks of activity -- one soon after administration and the second several hours later.[4]
Vetsulin is FDA-approved for use in dogs only. It can be used in cats but insulin resistance secondary to anti-insulin antibodies is a theoretical concern in this species. Some dogs may be adequately controlled with once-daily administration, but most dogs require twice-daily dosing.[5] i recommend a conservative starting dose of 0.5 U/kg to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia. Doses should be adjusted based on serial glucose measurements: increase by 10% to 15% in a persistently hyperglycemic patient (glucose > 250 mg/dl) and decrease by 255 if hypoglycemia (glucose < 70 mg/dl) is noted.

NPH Insulin. This form of insulin is a human recombinant type and is available in a U-100 concentration (e.g. Humulin N - Eli Lilly, Novolin N - Novo Nordisk). NPH is an intermediate-duration insulin with modest potency. It can be used in both cats and dogs and is an economical option in large dogs (when compared with Vetsulin). Twice-daily dosing is usually necessary and a starting dose of 0.5 U/kg is generally appropriate.[6,7] As with Vetsulin, dosages should be adjusted based on serial glucose measurements: increase by 10% to 15% in a persistently hyperglycemic patient (glucose > 250 mg/dl) and decrease by 255 if hypoglycemia (glucose < 70 mg/dl) is noted.

k9diabetes
11-10-2008, 08:31 AM
A bump to refresh this post for new members.

k9diabetes
12-16-2008, 08:48 PM
Bringing forward for new members.