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Old 02-15-2011, 04:30 PM
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k9diabetes k9diabetes is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Northern California
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Default Re: problems with aggressive dog injections

We have just been having a long discussion in Everything Else about a pair of dogs fighting and how medication has been very helpful for my dog with his anxiety. This might be something to consider for your dog - it can't be pleasant for her to be so anxious all of the time.

Has her thyroid level been checked recently?

Hypothyroid can commonly go along with diabetes - these endocrine disorders tend to bunch together - and hypothyroid can make a dog more aggressive. As can pain from something else.

My dog, who is not diabetic but who has fear aggression issues, is much better behaved at the vet and other unfamiliar environments where he "stuffs" his fear instead of acting on it. At home, he acts on his fears. So there could be some of that dynamic going on. It could also be that she knows that this works to stop the shots. She doesn't like them and goes with what works.

In which case sometimes it's just a matter of refusing to give up and continuing to try to find ways to distract her or reward her for good behavior.

My diabetic dog was a breeze to deal with but the dog I have now... injections could definitely be a problem if he were to become diabetic and home testing might not be possible.

Injecting while eating or a reward after can sometimes work.

Some people have gotten their dogs used to injections by doing many many "pretend shots" where they go through the motions with a capped syringe until the dog gets used to this and then slowly move on to real injections.

So all we can really do is list a ton of little tricks that individually or combined might work. Think specifically about your dog - what does she view as a reward? Would she preferred to be more restrained or less restrained maybe while being injected? Is there a room where she would be more comfortable? Would eating distract her enough to give the shot while she's eating?

Eventually, everyone I know has found something that worked for them.

Hang in there,

Natalie
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